Publications

Tackling the Underrepresentation of Women.

*This article won the First Prize in the EWI NextGen Competition, 2017 
By Kasey Robinson, GenderHopes, 2 August 2017
For the full article, please click here.
In this article, Kasey Robinson discusses the underrepresentation of women in diplomacy and in post-conflict negotiation. She notes the importance of equal representation to increase a society’s peacefulness, decrease domestic violence rates and increase the likelihood of success for peace accords.

 Rwanda Rediscovered

By Vibeke Thomsen, GenderHopes. 26 August 2014.
For the full article, please click here.
In July 2014, the Akilah Institute for Women organised a trip to Rwanda for its’ friends and supporters. I participated in this trip and  had the opportunity to visit the Genocide Memorials in Kigali, the Millenium Village in Nyamata, trek with the gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes Mountains and visit the Akagera National Park. I also met with students at the Akilah Institute and heard their stories.

A participant’s view on the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, London 10 – 13 June 2014.

By Vibeke Thomsen, GenderHopes. 18 June 2014.
For the full article, please click here.
I had the opportunity to attend the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict and to participate in the panel discussion organised by the Global Diplomacy Forum on how we can change perceptions of perpetrators that sexual violence in war zones is acceptable and non-punishable.

Central African Republic becomes third African country to elect female President.

By Vibeke Thomsen, GenderHopes. Make Every Woman Count, 25 February 2014.
For the full article, please click here.
On 20th January 2014, lawmakers in the war torn Central African Republic elected Catherine Samba-Panza as their interim President, hereby sending a positive message of cooperation and a light of hope.

‘Survival Sex’: How NGOs and peacekeepers exploit women in war.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Women Under Siege, 29 July 2013. 
For the full article, please click here.
In the conflict-prone Democratic Republic of Congo, where rape is common, several women also suffer from another form of sexualized violence: “survival sex,” the exchange of sexual favors for food or other necessary goods with everyone from NGO workers to UN peacekeepers to local men who have goods that are otherwise scarce. This article discusses the consequences of such abuses and why they take place.

UNSCR 2106: It’s all about gender equality.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Make Every Woman Count, 18 July 2013.
For the full article, please click here.
United Nations Security Council Resolution 2106, adopted on 24th June 2013 is innovative as it puts the roots of sexual violence at its core and focuses on the need for true gender equality in order to stop gender-based and sexual violence in conflict. This editorial is co-published here with Make Every Woman Count.

Oh! The places you CAN go!

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. World Pulse, 8 April 2013.
For the full article, please click here.
This essay was published as part of the World Pulse campaign “Girls Transform the World”. It is dedicated to the author’s daughters and makes the comparison between the rights of women and  girls in various parts of the world.

Guinea: Violence against women to continue until women are part of all decision-making processes.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Make Every Woman Count, 28 November 2012.
For the full article, please click here.
Published on the occasion of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, this article talks about two pervasive forms of women’s rights abuses in Guinea: FGM and sexual violence during the political demonstrations of 2009.

Egypt: Young Egyptians take the streets to end violence against women.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Make Every Woman Count, 27 November 2012.
For the full article, please click here.
This article was published for the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence and it discusses the raising popular resistance against the pervasive violations of women’s rights by governmental forces.

Will NATO leave Afghan women at risk?

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Women Under Siege Project, 20 September 2012.
For the full article, please click here.
This article discusses the upcoming departure of NATO forces from Afghanistan and its impact on the lives of women. It argues that for the country to thrive, ISAF will have to place a special emphasis on gender issues.

Sweden Says: Its time for a common EU position to end prostitution.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Café Babel, 31 May 2012.
For the full article, please click here.
This article discusses the legalization of prostitution and the consequences of differing legislations across the EU. Taking the example of Sweden, who made prostitution illegal in 1999, the author argues that the legalization of prostitution fuels gender-based violence as well as human trafficking.

Muslim women in France choose between integration and tradition.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. The SunFlower Post, 27 April 2012.
For the full article, please click here.
This article discusses the situation of young Muslim women in France, compared to their male counterparts and analyses the different challenges and opportunities faced by immigrant men and women.

As Africa’s second female President Joyce Banda takes office, new hopes for Malawi.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Make Every Woman Count, 11 April 2012.
For the full article, please click here.
Joyce Banda, Africa’s second female President was sworn in to office today in Malawi. The tasks ahead of her are important, ranging from combatting hunger and poverty to promoting the participation and empowerment of women in Malawi but her appointment also signals a new turn and hope for her country and for Africa.

Men are Key to Improve Women’s Rights in Africa – and Worldwide.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Make Every Woman Count, 28 February 2012.
For the full article, please click here.
This article discusses the importance of involving men at all levels of gender-oriented policies. Without the involvement and understanding of men on the importance to educate women and girls and to empower them, notably in terms of their reproductive health, the efforts towards gender equality and the promotion of women’s rights cannot be fully achieved.

Why the EU must Act to Stop Female Genital Mutilation.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Make Every Woman Count, 6 February 2012.
For the full article, please click here.
6 February marked the International Day of Zero Tolerance to Female Genital Mutilation. 500.000 women and girls are living with FGM and another 180.000 girls are at risk each year. This article calls for the EU to act within its own borders to end this scourge.

Investing in Girls.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Young Feminist Wire, AWID, 22 December 2011.
For the full article, please click here.
This blog analyses the Clock is Ticking video and discusses the impact of the Girl Effect on policy and decision making. It argues for the inclusion of men in gender-sensitive policies and for the importance of pursuing perpetrators of violence against women to achieve national reconciliation.

Women’s Rights are Human Rights too.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Make Every Woman Count, 9 December 2011
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For the full article, please click here.
As International Human Rights Day is celebrated worldwide on 10 December, this article discusses the challenges faced by African women in terms of human rights, such as sexual violence in conflict, FGM and trafficking into prostitution, as well women’s socio-economic and political impact on all spheres of societies. Most importantly, it discusses the importance of making women’s rights a full component of human rights.

An Arab Spring to End Violence Against Women.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. Gender Across Borders, 28 October 2011.
For full article, please click here.
To deny women the right to vote and to partake in political, social and economic questions that might concern them, constitutes a serious form of violence against women as it deprives them of the right to impact, to change and to challenge decisions that might be discriminatory towards them. While some Arab countries have used the cultural argument to prevent women from participating in political and social life, it is the duty of the international community to challenge such arguments and use its leverage to urge those states to enforce the rights of women and the respect of their basic rights. In that sense, international treaties, such as CEDAW, must be strongly reinforced by the entire international community so that such treaties do not become meaningless.

A New Libya Must Also Be For Women.

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, GenderHopes. ISIS Europe Blog, 5 September 2011.
For full article, please click here
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This short piece discusses the role of Libyan women in the revolution and the steps the National Transitional Council can take in order to put womens’ rights on the top of the agenda and make sure women are included in the post-conflict reconstruction of Libya.

Beyond Implementation: Making EU SSR effective.

By Giji Gya and Vibeke B. Thomsen. European Security Review nr. 46, October 2009.
For full article, please click here.
This article discusses the EU discourse and practice strives towards the effectiveness and efficiency in efforts towards crisis management and civilian missions. The majority of European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP) missions are on Security Sector Reform (SSR), particularly dealing with police and defence reform. This article discusses the practicality from experiences and lessons learnt by looking at the perspectives that make SSR work.

President Obama: A Leader for European Nuclear Disarmament?

By Vibeke B. Thomsen, European Security Review nr. 46, October 2009
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For the full article, please click here.
This article discusses the possible impact of a radical change of stance in the policy of the United States in terms of Weapons of Mass Destructions and disarmament on selected national and common policies of EU Member States.

One Year On: What is Next for Kosovo?

By Vibeke B. Thomsen. European Security Review nr. 43, March 2009.
For the full article, please click here.
As Kosovo celebrated its one year anniversary on 17 February 2009, a common EU position had still not been achieved and serious concerns regarding the future of the province remained. The mandate of the EU mission on the ground was still a subject of debate while Kosovo continued to be faced with economic, ethnic and social challenges.

France: Disarming or Upgrading?

By Vibeke B. Thomsen. European Security Review nr. 41, November 2008.
For the full article, please click here.
France continuously reaffirms itself as a nuclear weapon power, arguing that nuclear deterrence is the essential foundation of France’s national defence strategy and that it guarantees France’s security and independence. However, in recent years, France’s decision to improve its nuclear capacities is confronted with a slow fading of public opinion support and an increasing opposition from several EU Member States and MEPs who wish to see the EU as a nuclear-free-zone.

 

GUEST PUBLICATIONS

Women Deliver: A Conference that Delivers on Girls’ and Women’s Rights

By Kasey Robinson, 20 May 2016
For the full article, please click here.
From 16 to 19th May, Women Deliver held it’s fourth Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. Speakers included Helen Clark, administrator at UNDP, Melinda Gates, co-founder of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Muhammad Yunus, founder of the Grameen Movement and Nobel Peace Price winner. Click here to read the article by Kasey Robinson of GenderHopes on how the Women Deliver conference has delivered on improving the rights of women and girls.

Education in post-conflict Northern Uganda

By Wanja Munaita, 5 January 2016 
For the full article, please click here.
A significant proportion of the 132 million children out-of-school worldwide live in countries affected by war and natural disaster. Education restores routine and gives people hope for the future; it can also serve as a channel both for meeting other basic humanitarian needs and communicating vital messages that promote safety and wellbeing

The role of Women in Peace-building: Afghanistan’s Awakening?

By Anne Marrillet, 18 December 2015 
For the full article, please click here.
In this article, Anne Marrillet analyses the crucial role played by women in building peace and bringing democracy to Afghanistan. She highlights the importance of civil society, educational workshops and the importance of including women in all peace-building initiatives.

Mauritius Appoints First Female President

By Belinda Ogden, 22 June 2015
For the full article, please click here.
In this article, Belinda Ogden writes about the first female President of Mauritius and about the positive outlook for the future for the island nation.

Gentlemen, Please Rise

By Lucy Coote, 22 April 2015
For the full article, please click here.
After watching the documentary The Mask You Live In, Lucy Coote explores the dimensions of masculinities, discussing the societal pressures put on men and boys to conform to a limiting and often aggressive ideal of manhood – and how this affects society as a whole.

 She’s Not For Sale

By Lucy Coote, 13 October 2014
For the full article, please click here.
In this article, Lucy Coote explores ways in which the media and advertisements misrepresent and sexualise young women in order to sell products. She discusses ways in which this harms women and their body image and self-confidence. This piece was written following the viewing of the documentary Miss Representation.

The Hidden Effects of Climate Change

By Tonni Brodber, UN Women, 17 July 2014. 
For the full article, please click here.
What is the link between Climate Change and Violence against Women? Why is Climate Change also a gender issue? Brodber’s article takes a close look at the effects of climate change in the Pacific and specifically how the effects of climate change impacts violence against women. Read the full article here

Gender Considerations in Conflict Analysis: the Case of Bosnia and Herzegovina

By Anne Marrillet, UNITAR, 16 April 2014. 
For the full article, please click here.
Women and men are affected in different ways by conflict and have different needs in post-conflict situations. This article discusses the 1992 conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina, including the mass rapes of women and executions of selected groups of men. It also highlights the specific challenges faced by women in post-conflict reconstruction.

Why I’m supporting Malala Day.

By Jenny Humphreys, 12 July 2013. 
For the full article, please click here.
On 12 July 2013, which marks Malala Day, when the world’s attention will focus on one courageous and determined teenager and her fight for girls’ education,  Jenny Humphreys writes of the obstacles faced by too many children and the life-changing opportunities they are being denied.

Violence against Women: Shattering Myths.

By Danielle Prince, 9 May  2013.
For the full article, please click here.
This article analyzes and demystifies the common myths which allow gender-based violence, such as domestic violence and rape, to continue occurring.

Redefining the Burqa: A Reflection from Afghanistan.

By Michelle Risinger, 4 March 2013.
For the full article, please click here. 
This article discusses the double implications of wearing the Burqa – and how wearing it can sometimes be used to women’s advantage!

The Contraception Conundrum: Not Just a Women’s Issue.

By Michelle Risinger, 13 February 2013. 
For the full article, please click here.
This article discusses the difficulties many women face in accessing contraception and in receiving reliable information about family planning. Changes in societal norms and cultural beliefs will be necessary to truly make an impact on the lives and choices of women.